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13/11/2009

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Greetings:

Regarding the question of the 58-year-old person looking for a job.

Basically ALL of the advice was wrong! Trying to hide your age is a terrible decision to make. Sooner or later, someone will find out that you really are over 50. This would be akin to someone who was Hindi trying to disguise his voice. Or someone who is African trying to bleach his skin. The answers given on the page suggested that the 50-year-old person should be ashamed of his/her age and try to hide it. NO WAY!! The answer itself showed age discrimination and you should be ashamed of it.

True, discrimination is wrong and, also true, you can't change it.

Find a company and position where your age is not important. Change fields. Change job types. Programmers are all teeny-geeks right out of college and haven't started shaving on a regular basis. Don't even TRY to work for them. Become a consultant and dispense the wisdom of
the ages - usually for a lot more money than they are making.

Remember, you're the Pro-from-Dover and you know the answers. Put them into a position where they want you to give them answers. Become a project manager. Become a consultant. Become a college professor.

These kids are ignorant of what you can provide so don't even try.

Take the high road. Assume the upper hand in negotiations. You know the answers and they don't. And they are going to have to pay dearly for their attitude.

JCO

JCO - you sound like a very bitter person - the kids are going to pay dearly for their attitude - really?!? I think the advice was actually pretty good. It's not about being ashamed of your age - it is about not making your age define who you are and what you offer.

Although a practice I do not condone I do have clients specifying they want someone young, which I have found particularly heightened in this current climate. I therefore do not blame candidates disguising their age on their CV. The CV is about getting your foot through the door and then impressing the employer persuading them that your experience is an asset not a vice.

I recently came across this excellent article which I am constantly coming up against with our candidates...

I, too, am an older worker who recently lost her job. And I have to agree with TCI. I have (younger) friends in management positions, who admit to me, that even though it's illegal to discriminate based on age, it's done all the time, and they check ages on facebook and/or LinkedIn, not wanting someone older. Is it short-sighted, yes?! But, it's a reality, and very, very difficult to prove in this day and age. My advice is this: make sure you are passionate about what you're doing. If you are, and you can freelance, as TCI advises, do it! I am a creative talent in advertising. I LOVE what I do and am confident in what I know. I have a lot of awards and experience, but would I change my field, even if I were out of work a year? If I don't have to (financially), no way! Pray, stay focused, know what you want and go after it with a vengeance. Although I've been out of work just a month, I know that's probably easier said than done. But, I am doing EVERYTHING in my power to prove my "stick-to-itiveness". Try to participate in some free webinars. I've already signed up for 2, and taken one. Most of the info is very, very helpful. If you disagree with anything, just glean the information you want to take with you, and discard the rest.

Sorry this is so long. I just wanted to provide encouragement, as we all need it, between just the negativity of people and the general job market. Try not to doubt yourself. You wouldn't have worked for 30 years, and been successful, if you didn't have something to offer. Keep your chin up. What will happen, will happen when you probably least expect it!

Rhonda

Ideal is the beacon. Without ideal , there is no secure direction without direction , there is no life .Do you understand?

I'm afraid I have just been placed in the same position ... no income at 58.

I have spent the last 3 years developing ideas and technology within the creative sector for one of the worlds most significant brands as a freelancer ! I was asked to present to a huge audience ( twice ) in the US.

I am now no longer required, and the ideas have been adopted. The problem is 'what I do' is very specialised and limiting ... I just give up !

I have to get two daughters through University, pay a mortgage and all the rest of the day to day stuff.

I simply don't know where to start

HH

I'd argue that the best solution for a 58 year-old is not to compete on age. Compete on experience. Compete on connections available. Compete on insight. Compete on confidence of performance.

Reduce the risk that your employers would be taking if they hired someone less knowledgeable, less experienced, less accomplished, less connected and less confident than you.

In short, act like an entrepreneur.

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